Foreign Recipes

Corn Tomalito
Corn Tomalito

Corn Tomalito

Corn Cake
Corn Cake

A Mexican sweet corn cake with a spoon bread consistency. Lee Ann Clarke .

Mexica Spicy Rice
Mexica Spicy Rice

This rice is not for the sensitive palette. It packs a spicy punch, but still delivers a bold flavor that pairs well with grilled foods.

Chicken Enchiladas Suizas
Chicken Enchiladas Suizas

Enjoy the flavors of green chiles and the texture of shredded chicken in these Enchiladas Suiza. Melted cheese and sauteed spinach and onion only add to the unique taste. And if that weren't enough, these enchiladas are a snap to make, but they taste like you've spent hours in the kitchen. "

Koat Pitha
Koat Pitha

Koat Pitha (Banana Pitha) Recipe made easy, learn how to make Koat Pitha (Banana pitha) Recipes at home.

Banjari Gosht
Banjari Gosht

Banjara Gosht is cooking goat gypsy style where the spices are not ground into a smooth powder but pounded coarsely using a pestle. This dish is heavily influenced by Hyderabad style of cooking. The freshly pounded spices gave it a real authentic flavor.

Baingan da Bhurtha
Baingan da Bhurtha

Baingan bharta or Baingan ka bhurtha or Baingan da bhurtha is a South Asian dish bearing a resemblance to baba ganoush. Baingan bharta is a part of the national cuisines of both India and Pakistan. It is primarily a vegetarian dish that comprises bhurtha (minced vegetables) made from eggplant (baingan) which is grilled over charcoal or direct fire, to infuse the dish with a smoky flavour. The smoked eggplant is mashed with fresh cilantro (coriander leaves), chili pepper, onion and mustard oil. Traditionally, the dish is often eaten with an Indian flatbread (specifically roti or paratha) and is also served with rice and/or raita, a yogurt salad. Baingan bartha is also eaten in Bangladesh.

Gatte Ki Sabji
Gatte Ki Sabji

Gram flour dumplings flavoured with dry spices, steamed and then dunked into a yoghurt based curry is a traditional Rajasthani speciality. Enjoy this dish either with puris or steamed rice.

Dahi Keema Samosa
Dahi Keema Samosa

Dahi Keema Samosa

Dahi Shrikhand
Dahi Shrikhand

Dahi Shrikhand

Gulab Jamun
Gulab Jamun

Gulab Jamun is a dessert common in the countries of the Indian subcontinent. The Persian word Gulab (گلاب) means rose, as rosewater syrup is often used, although saffron syrup and honey are also common. Jamun may refer to the jambul fruit, which is usually of a similar size to pieces of the dessert. There are various claims regarding the originator of the dish, with some saying a Sikh chef named Sajjan Dhillon first prepared it as a delicacy for the king of Punjab. The dessert also became popular throughout the Ottoman Empire.

Adrak Soup
Adrak Soup

Adrak Shorba is a must try for every one! One of my favorite recipes, this hot concoction can make you feel better in an instant when you're feeling down. The jaggery is used to counter the strong and pungent taste of the ginger. For all those of you who love ginger and strong pungent food this soup is great. Since it does not require too many ingredients and can be prepared in a jiffy.

Okra Roast
Okra Roast

The okra come out slightly crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, and they’re perfect finger food (like green French fries, but don’t use ketchup). Even my husband, who says that okra is not his favorite vegetable, loved these.The perfect side dish or light lunch–super-easy, fat-free, and delicious.

Rasogolla
Rasogolla

rasgulla originated in Odisha, where it is also known by its original name, Khira mōhana. It has been a traditional Oriya dish for centuries. People throughout the state consider the rasgullas prepared by the Kar brothers, the descendants of a local confectioner, Bikalananda Kar, in the town of Salepur, near Cuttack to be the best. Today this rasgulla famously named Bikali Kar Rasgulla is sold all over Odisha Another variant of this dish that is made in the town of Pahal, located between the cities of Bhubaneswar and Cuttack, is also very popular locally

Rajasthani Churma
Rajasthani Churma

Rajasthani food is incomplete without the mention of the famed Dal-Baati-Churma. What started as a picnic food has become a distinctive cuisine of the State. It consists of baatis or flaky round breads baked over firewood or over kandas (i.e. cow dung cakes) as done in villages. Baatis can be baked in a gas tandoor or an electric oven as well. Bafla or steamed baatis are also very popular.